The Secret of El Dorado! (And how to get there)

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AuthorMessage
Petty Officer
Feb 24, 2013
69
Thunder Hawk on Dec 31, 2014 wrote:
A paradox is an endless loop of events, usually triggered by time travel. A well known paradox is the "Grandfather Paradox," in which you use time travel to kill your (true: the reason I say true is because there's a possibility you could be adopted without knowing it.) grandfather. If you kill your grandfather, your parents would never have been born, resulting in your "never-birth."

It's a cycle that continues over and over until you die or your family tree just kinda blows up. Ouch.

~ Thunder

P.S. Yes, it's extremely risky. Don't try this at home, kids.
Wait wait wait!!!! If my grandparents die, I'll die?!? Well, say goodbye to further life when they do die.

Petty Officer
Feb 24, 2013
69
Sometimes, I wonder if time travel even exists. If not, it will be practically impossible to see our parents.

Commodore
Sep 20, 2009
938
Oh, but time travel is completely possible. We're traveling through time constantly. The issue we have, is that we can only go forward. The part that's missing is directional control over time travel. Sadly, we're not in the right dimension for that. I believe directional control over the time axis only comes in and following the fifth dimension. We are stuck in the fourth dimension. (Time, lenght, width, height).

However, if we could travel back in time, would we actually be able to alter anything?
I'm not too sure, perhaps we could alter small things accidently, but I'd say we would never be able to alter time intentionally. Simply because, if the idea of change time was our trigger for time travel, would we still have that trigger if time was altered to our design? Simply put, you wouldn't go back in time to pick an apple three hours ago, if three hours ago you picked the apple.

Captain
May 16, 2011
553
Thunder Hawk on Dec 31, 2014 wrote:
A paradox is an endless loop of events, usually triggered by time travel. A well known paradox is the "Grandfather Paradox," in which you use time travel to kill your (true: the reason I say true is because there's a possibility you could be adopted without knowing it.) grandfather. If you kill your grandfather, your parents would never have been born, resulting in your "never-birth."

It's a cycle that continues over and over until you die or your family tree just kinda blows up. Ouch.

~ Thunder

P.S. Yes, it's extremely risky. Don't try this at home, kids.
Oh, gosh! I forgot something vital! If you were never born, you wouldn't have the ability to kill your Grandfather. That's when the paradox happens. Er, when? Why? Who- nope. How?

Oops.

Hopefully, you had realized this before I attempted to patch my mistake.

Oops.

~ Thunder

Petty Officer
Feb 24, 2013
69
CdeWinter on Jan 11, 2015 wrote:
Oh, but time travel is completely possible. We're traveling through time constantly. The issue we have, is that we can only go forward. The part that's missing is directional control over time travel. Sadly, we're not in the right dimension for that. I believe directional control over the time axis only comes in and following the fifth dimension. We are stuck in the fourth dimension. (Time, lenght, width, height).

However, if we could travel back in time, would we actually be able to alter anything?
I'm not too sure, perhaps we could alter small things accidently, but I'd say we would never be able to alter time intentionally. Simply because, if the idea of change time was our trigger for time travel, would we still have that trigger if time was altered to our design? Simply put, you wouldn't go back in time to pick an apple three hours ago, if three hours ago you picked the apple.
Every single second counts as the future, but I meant as: could we travel forward in time in more than 10 years? You see, no skills are needed for seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, or years. But there is a missing piece in the fabric that allows us to travel more than 10 years. In other words, speed up time. If we travel in the past, however, one teeny tiny thing can change everything in the present. Like, killing your parents in the past, would lead you to killing yourself, and if you grew up to be a popular person or the head of a company in the future, then death in the past would cause everything to change. But, while people are altering the past, what's happening to the present when you see it with your own eyes? Well, if those people killed the head of a glassware company, just an example, then all the glass would disappear right before your eyes. My word of advice? Do not mess with time travel. I've seen some people mess with it, and there will be such thing as World War 4 in the present!

Pirate Overlord
Mar 16, 2012
9075
Practical Gorman W... on Jan 17, 2015 wrote:
Every single second counts as the future, but I meant as: could we travel forward in time in more than 10 years? You see, no skills are needed for seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, or years. But there is a missing piece in the fabric that allows us to travel more than 10 years. In other words, speed up time. If we travel in the past, however, one teeny tiny thing can change everything in the present. Like, killing your parents in the past, would lead you to killing yourself, and if you grew up to be a popular person or the head of a company in the future, then death in the past would cause everything to change. But, while people are altering the past, what's happening to the present when you see it with your own eyes? Well, if those people killed the head of a glassware company, just an example, then all the glass would disappear right before your eyes. My word of advice? Do not mess with time travel. I've seen some people mess with it, and there will be such thing as World War 4 in the present!
A good example of time travel and parallel universes is, believe it or not, the movie It's a Wonderful Life. This holiday classic shows us the life of George Bailey as he lived it and what happens when he wishes he had never been born; the wish is granted and he sees his community and how one man's life can affects others - an alternative reality without George Bailey.

Petty Officer
Feb 24, 2013
69
anecorbie on Jan 18, 2015 wrote:
A good example of time travel and parallel universes is, believe it or not, the movie It's a Wonderful Life. This holiday classic shows us the life of George Bailey as he lived it and what happens when he wishes he had never been born; the wish is granted and he sees his community and how one man's life can affects others - an alternative reality without George Bailey.
I also forgot to include switching dimensions, but you got that.

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