I need advice...

AuthorMessage
First Mate
Oct 15, 2012
449
I know this is a non-pirate101 themed question, but I need some advice. My friend at school has asthma. She can't make the cardios we do at school. She also has ADHD and she gets bad grades. I need some advice.

Captain
Mar 09, 2011
709
pirate101 lover on Mar 15, 2014 wrote:
I know this is a non-pirate101 themed question, but I need some advice. My friend at school has asthma. She can't make the cardios we do at school. She also has ADHD and she gets bad grades. I need some advice.
Hey Natalie! I'm so glad you care so much for your friend. It takes a really special person to be so concerned for those she cares about.

I feel kind of bad suggesting this, as this would mean that you wouldn't get to see your friend as often... but I think that homeschooling would be the best option for her. Her parents don't really need to do anything in regards to schooling her; example: my schooling is online and in text books, all my parents do is monitor that I'm getting the stuff done, and they don't even need to do that much.

It may seem like there aren't many social options in homeschool, but there are tons! I'm apart of a few homeschool groups (two of them are co-ops), and the first co-op that I went to was created for kids with severe peanut allergies, so that it was a completely safe social environment for them. I'm sure similar things are out there for your friend's asthma and ADHD.

Personally, I came to homeschool because public school was overcrowded, and my grades were suffering from it. I got an F in division, simply because the kid sitting next to me was so loud and distracting that I couldn't learn properly, and division was hard for me. My needs weren't being met, so I asked to come to homeschool.

Now I'm more than two years above the grade level of my peers who are still in public school. Though... I still hate algebra. XD

As for exercise, if she comes to homeschool, that's completely up to her and her family for what she does. For me, I have to exercise for at least half an hour for at least three days in the week. Also, my family and I are going to a ballroom dance tonight, which counts as my exercise. Some kids don't exercise at all except for maybe a mall crawl with their friends. Either way, if she does come to homeschool, her needs will be much better met. She can sleep in, do her school in her pj's if she wants to, and it doesn't matter if she's struggling with a subject or if she's excelling in one -- you can adjust your grade level as needed. Example: my math grade is the lowest, though my literature one (reading and writing) is a few grades higher than that. She can be the same way, and not be held back by her weaknesses.

If she does choose homeschool, make sure you stay in touch with her. After I left public school, I never communicated with the friends I made there again. I've always wondered what's happened to them, and I don't want the same thing to happen to you and your friend. I really hope that, whatever she does, it works out for you guys. You're a great friend, Natalie, and she's lucky to have one like you.

~ Liz

Pirate Overlord
Mar 10, 2009
6079
pirate101 lover on Mar 15, 2014 wrote:
I know this is a non-pirate101 themed question, but I need some advice. My friend at school has asthma. She can't make the cardios we do at school. She also has ADHD and she gets bad grades. I need some advice.
What area of her life do you wish to help? Sometimes just being a good friend and standing by her side can make all the difference in the world. Being different in a school environment can really make you feel left out and make you think poorly of yourself. You job could be to help her to see what a wonderful person she is and that who she his has really nothing to do with her asthma or her ADHD. Help her to see herself the way you do. Help her to see her beautiful and healthy heart.

First Mate
Dec 13, 2009
409
pirate101 lover on Mar 15, 2014 wrote:
I know this is a non-pirate101 themed question, but I need some advice. My friend at school has asthma. She can't make the cardios we do at school. She also has ADHD and she gets bad grades. I need some advice.
If she has asthma, her parents should send in a note. She shouldn't be TRYING the exercises.

Pirate Overlord
Mar 10, 2009
6079
Just Add Bacon on Mar 15, 2014 wrote:
Hey Natalie! I'm so glad you care so much for your friend. It takes a really special person to be so concerned for those she cares about.

I feel kind of bad suggesting this, as this would mean that you wouldn't get to see your friend as often... but I think that homeschooling would be the best option for her. Her parents don't really need to do anything in regards to schooling her; example: my schooling is online and in text books, all my parents do is monitor that I'm getting the stuff done, and they don't even need to do that much.

It may seem like there aren't many social options in homeschool, but there are tons! I'm apart of a few homeschool groups (two of them are co-ops), and the first co-op that I went to was created for kids with severe peanut allergies, so that it was a completely safe social environment for them. I'm sure similar things are out there for your friend's asthma and ADHD.

Personally, I came to homeschool because public school was overcrowded, and my grades were suffering from it. I got an F in division, simply because the kid sitting next to me was so loud and distracting that I couldn't learn properly, and division was hard for me. My needs weren't being met, so I asked to come to homeschool.

Now I'm more than two years above the grade level of my peers who are still in public school. Though... I still hate algebra. XD

As for exercise, if she comes to homeschool, that's completely up to her and her family for what she does. For me, I have to exercise for at least half an hour for at least three days in the week. Also, my family and I are going to a ballroom dance tonight, which counts as my exercise. Some kids don't exercise at all except for maybe a mall crawl with their friends. Either way, if she does come to homeschool, her needs will be much better met. She can sleep in, do her school in her pj's if she wants to, and it doesn't matter if she's struggling with a subject or if she's excelling in one -- you can adjust your grade level as needed. Example: my math grade is the lowest, though my literature one (reading and writing) is a few grades higher than that. She can be the same way, and not be held back by her weaknesses.

If she does choose homeschool, make sure you stay in touch with her. After I left public school, I never communicated with the friends I made there again. I've always wondered what's happened to them, and I don't want the same thing to happen to you and your friend. I really hope that, whatever she does, it works out for you guys. You're a great friend, Natalie, and she's lucky to have one like you.

~ Liz
Well said Liz. You are an excellent embassador for home schooling. I helped to teach my nieces in homeschooling, I did computer classes and music and they all thrived at it. They all graduated at college levels and were part of several co-ops too. Some of their classes they did online and even had some where they skyped into classes and could interact with the class and teachers in real time. Brilliant suggestion.

First Mate
Oct 15, 2012
449
Just Add Bacon on Mar 15, 2014 wrote:
Hey Natalie! I'm so glad you care so much for your friend. It takes a really special person to be so concerned for those she cares about.

I feel kind of bad suggesting this, as this would mean that you wouldn't get to see your friend as often... but I think that homeschooling would be the best option for her. Her parents don't really need to do anything in regards to schooling her; example: my schooling is online and in text books, all my parents do is monitor that I'm getting the stuff done, and they don't even need to do that much.

It may seem like there aren't many social options in homeschool, but there are tons! I'm apart of a few homeschool groups (two of them are co-ops), and the first co-op that I went to was created for kids with severe peanut allergies, so that it was a completely safe social environment for them. I'm sure similar things are out there for your friend's asthma and ADHD.

Personally, I came to homeschool because public school was overcrowded, and my grades were suffering from it. I got an F in division, simply because the kid sitting next to me was so loud and distracting that I couldn't learn properly, and division was hard for me. My needs weren't being met, so I asked to come to homeschool.

Now I'm more than two years above the grade level of my peers who are still in public school. Though... I still hate algebra. XD

As for exercise, if she comes to homeschool, that's completely up to her and her family for what she does. For me, I have to exercise for at least half an hour for at least three days in the week. Also, my family and I are going to a ballroom dance tonight, which counts as my exercise. Some kids don't exercise at all except for maybe a mall crawl with their friends. Either way, if she does come to homeschool, her needs will be much better met. She can sleep in, do her school in her pj's if she wants to, and it doesn't matter if she's struggling with a subject or if she's excelling in one -- you can adjust your grade level as needed. Example: my math grade is the lowest, though my literature one (reading and writing) is a few grades higher than that. She can be the same way, and not be held back by her weaknesses.

If she does choose homeschool, make sure you stay in touch with her. After I left public school, I never communicated with the friends I made there again. I've always wondered what's happened to them, and I don't want the same thing to happen to you and your friend. I really hope that, whatever she does, it works out for you guys. You're a great friend, Natalie, and she's lucky to have one like you.

~ Liz
I don't think she should be home schooled for two reasons:
1. I won't see her as often.
2. She said her parent's cuss to her at her house. i don't know if home schooling would be the best idea, but thank you for suggesting it.

First Mate
Oct 15, 2012
449
Chrissy Th'Blesser on Mar 15, 2014 wrote:
What area of her life do you wish to help? Sometimes just being a good friend and standing by her side can make all the difference in the world. Being different in a school environment can really make you feel left out and make you think poorly of yourself. You job could be to help her to see what a wonderful person she is and that who she his has really nothing to do with her asthma or her ADHD. Help her to see herself the way you do. Help her to see her beautiful and healthy heart.
I need help with telling her that her asthma and ADHD won't be the end of her and not being able to go to a good collage and her asthma shouldn't stop her from exercising. My friend doesn't have ADHD anymore, now it is just ADD. She doesn't have the hyper part in her anymore.

Commodore
Jan 22, 2013
846
You should tell her to see a doctor about the ADD so she can get medication. Also exercising helps asthma so you should tell her to keep on doing that but not to much in one dose. And about the cussing, if it gets more aggressive then she may need to call the police who can make sure she's safe and out of harms way.

Pirate Overlord
Mar 10, 2009
6079
pirate101 lover on Mar 16, 2014 wrote:
I need help with telling her that her asthma and ADHD won't be the end of her and not being able to go to a good collage and her asthma shouldn't stop her from exercising. My friend doesn't have ADHD anymore, now it is just ADD. She doesn't have the hyper part in her anymore.
How about doing some research on people that have asthma and ADD and are very successful? That way she will have some mentors to look up to and hopefully some of them will have written some stuff telling how they dealt with it. There is a lot of help on web sites that deal with those very things. A little research can go a long way plus just being the kind of friend you already are to her.

Lieutenant
Jul 15, 2013
122