Ideas what could have happend to all the rain

AuthorMessage
Commodore
Jan 22, 2013
846
So mainly it has not been there for a LONG time. Droughts normally last that long and I'm not talking about the bananas ( might have something to do with it.) but really it's kinda weird that lots of other worlds in the spiral are always so water plenty full and that one isn't. Could it be a curse or maybe someone with the monkey's paw wished for no more. My theory is that when donkey hotay (that book looks funny) wished for it to rain one million bananas it made it not rain anymore. Wishing it to rain something else then giving it a number which cancels out the fact that it will rain again = pi just joking it = there will be no more rain since the rain wish ran out. But I'm interested to hear other what you guys think. So think up of something and post

-Jack nightgale lvl 65 buccaneer

Pirate Overlord
Mar 16, 2012
5740
sparticus32 on Apr 20, 2014 wrote:
So mainly it has not been there for a LONG time. Droughts normally last that long and I'm not talking about the bananas ( might have something to do with it.) but really it's kinda weird that lots of other worlds in the spiral are always so water plenty full and that one isn't. Could it be a curse or maybe someone with the monkey's paw wished for no more. My theory is that when donkey hotay (that book looks funny) wished for it to rain one million bananas it made it not rain anymore. Wishing it to rain something else then giving it a number which cancels out the fact that it will rain again = pi just joking it = there will be no more rain since the rain wish ran out. But I'm interested to hear other what you guys think. So think up of something and post

-Jack nightgale lvl 65 buccaneer
I'm thinking that Monquista is an old world, that is slowly dying.

Petty Officer
Aug 27, 2010
84
Simply due to the climate and atmosphere. Also, since we know that the worlds have a predetermined orbit, we can assume that Monquista simply 'flew' too close to the sun.

Commodore
Jan 22, 2013
846
MarleybonePatriot on Apr 23, 2014 wrote:
Simply due to the climate and atmosphere. Also, since we know that the worlds have a predetermined orbit, we can assume that Monquista simply 'flew' too close to the sun.
Where is the sun anyway? I never have seen it in the map

Commodore
Jan 22, 2013
846
sparticus32 on Apr 25, 2014 wrote:
Where is the sun anyway? I never have seen it in the map
In the one in wiz101 in Ambrose's tower

Petty Officer
Aug 27, 2010
84
sparticus32 on Apr 25, 2014 wrote:
Where is the sun anyway? I never have seen it in the map
In an arbitrary spot in the Spiral, along with the moon. You can see it in Cool Ranch and Mooshu, while Marleybone, I think, hosts a wonderful view of the moon.

Pirate Overlord
Mar 10, 2009
6079
MarleybonePatriot on Apr 30, 2014 wrote:
In an arbitrary spot in the Spiral, along with the moon. You can see it in Cool Ranch and Mooshu, while Marleybone, I think, hosts a wonderful view of the moon.
There is only one spot in Marleybone where you can see that gorgeous full moon. Has anyone else found it?

Commodore
Sep 20, 2009
814
I see it as a case of desertification (man, scientists have fun creating new words), or simply the process by which a normally wet, humid area becomes a desert. If I remember correctly, the region we currently visit in Monquista is bordered by tall mountains.

Mountain ranges create phenomena known as rain shadows, basically the side of the mountain range that looks toward or against the predominate wind direction is frequently very fertile, and receives a lot of rainfall, while the other side of the mountain range experiences a reduction in the amount of rainfall. This can be easily noted along the Rocky Mountains. In many places on the oceanic side of the Rocky Mountains lies a particular biome known as a temperate rain forest (ie British Columbia) or at least a fertile forested area (ie Northern California, Oregon). While on the other side of the mountain range lies a desert, (ie Nevada, Southern Alberta).

Basically as the rains storms are pushed up the mountain range by the wind, the begin to condense as they reach higher, colder regions of the atmosphere. This causes the rain to occur almost completely on one side of the mountain range, causing the other side to become a desert.

I believe, that if we ever see what is on the other side of that Monquistan mountain range, we will find a rather lush jungle or rain forest possibly inhabited by gorillas and orangutans.

Admiral
Jun 02, 2013
1246
dont ruin it im still in mooshu

Pirate Overlord
Mar 10, 2009
6079
CdeWinter on May 3, 2014 wrote:
I see it as a case of desertification (man, scientists have fun creating new words), or simply the process by which a normally wet, humid area becomes a desert. If I remember correctly, the region we currently visit in Monquista is bordered by tall mountains.

Mountain ranges create phenomena known as rain shadows, basically the side of the mountain range that looks toward or against the predominate wind direction is frequently very fertile, and receives a lot of rainfall, while the other side of the mountain range experiences a reduction in the amount of rainfall. This can be easily noted along the Rocky Mountains. In many places on the oceanic side of the Rocky Mountains lies a particular biome known as a temperate rain forest (ie British Columbia) or at least a fertile forested area (ie Northern California, Oregon). While on the other side of the mountain range lies a desert, (ie Nevada, Southern Alberta).

Basically as the rains storms are pushed up the mountain range by the wind, the begin to condense as they reach higher, colder regions of the atmosphere. This causes the rain to occur almost completely on one side of the mountain range, causing the other side to become a desert.

I believe, that if we ever see what is on the other side of that Monquistan mountain range, we will find a rather lush jungle or rain forest possibly inhabited by gorillas and orangutans.
Great teaching of facts and very picturesque. I just love it when you Professors share your amazing knowledge with us. Thank you for enriching my mind once more.

Commodore
Sep 20, 2009
814
Chrissy Th'Blesser on May 4, 2014 wrote:
Great teaching of facts and very picturesque. I just love it when you Professors share your amazing knowledge with us. Thank you for enriching my mind once more.
Thanks Chrissy, but you know, I'm not actually a professor, just a "master" but really, Master of Science does sound better to me than Doctor of Philosophy.